Running Out of Excuses

I used to ride a bike. Then I fell out of love.

I used to run. Then in 2012 I picked up a couple of injuries and had to stop for a while. A while doesn’t have an end date, so weeks became months, months became years. I got lazy and out of shape. Worse still, I convinced myself that a recurrence of my injuries wasn’t worth the risk, and though I’ve been a much more active walker of late, I know I’m not really getting any fitter. I keep kidding myself that being in shape will somehow just magically happen.

Yesterday evening, out of the blue Keira suggested that the three of us go for a run the following morning. Carole runs regularly and Keira is full of beans and super fit. Maybe it was the prosecco talking, but I agreed to join in.

Sunday morning. I got up regretting my commitment to run and then, serendipitously, read ‘How Far Will Your Baby Steps Take You?‘ by Tim Scott. Tim’s post is a lovely piece of encouragement, and he wins extra points for mentioning guitars too. It turns out that Tim’s post, and Keira and Carole’s enthusiasm are a powerful combination.

I’m not kidding myself, it’s a long way to the top if you wanna rock n roll. But you have to start somewhere and this morning’s 3.1 miles (my first run in over two years) will do me just fine.

Update: May 2015

The running didn’t stick, my knees are definitely not as fond of the idea as the rest of me! I kept on walking through the Spring and Summer and then I discovered a few friends in America taking part in Runners Week Run Streak. This was a challenge for people to try and run for at least a mile every day between Thanksgiving and New year’s Day. I joined in at walking pace and managed to get the job done. You can read more about how I got on here.

Once the Runners Week challenge was complete, during which time I completed 111.1 miles (spooky huh), I just kept on going. I’m currently clocking up somewhere between 140 and 150 miles a month, you can read more about how I’m getting on here.

6 thoughts on “Running Out of Excuses

    1. Doug Shaw Post author

      Cool – thanks Janine – lovely to hear from you and it’s always nice to know when something strikes a chord with others.

      Reply
  1. Julia Briggs

    It must be the weather – I’ve just promised myself to run tomorrow – the first time in a year. I think there is a difference between getting over something (it not being right anymore – e.g.: aerobics and leotards) and just losing touch with something, which we need to get back to, but it requires a bit of grit.
    Perhaps there is a way of working out which is which?

    PS re: the value card on this post – just finished reading (and taking great note) of the 4 hour work week. Ruthlessly simplify and automate.

    Reply
    1. Doug Shaw Post author

      Indeed – getting over v losing touch. I am over my cycling time trialling, and for me the running thing has continued to nag me. So – I’ll see how it goes, it is interesting trying to return to something freely whilst still having a niggle in my mind that it might all blow up again. I have a few aches today – but nothing more than I earned so that’s good. Enjoy fulfilling your promise.

      PS – the card is simply an ad for Stop Doing Dumb Things cards – I change it very infrequently and I’m pleased it worked for you today 🙂

      Reply
  2. Sarah Matthews

    Brilliant news. And, how fabulous to run as a family. The only thing that had stopped you running (or cycling!) is what’s inside your head. It doesn’t matter how far or how fast you go it’s all about just getting out and doing it.
    I lost my running mojo for a few years but stuck at it, struggled and was constantly beating myself up for running so slowly. Breaking my shoulder last summer gave me enforced rest to reflect on what I really wanted to achieve from sport and what I really enjoyed. I realised I was expecting my running to improve when I was only managing 2 runs a week. Wrong! I now try to run 4 times a week – even if its only a sneaky 20 mins. I love it again, feel great and have shed the couple of pounds I tried to blame on advancing years.

    Happy running!

    Reply
    1. Doug Shaw Post author

      Hi Sarah. I’m glad you are back enjoying your exercise. Yep – it is important to work out why we’re doing this stuff and how to fit it in sustainably.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *